One Shoot = Patience

This Old House is rather famous. This would be one of the most photographed old houses in Australia. It lies on the major road that leads just outside Burra in South Australia. Most people stop to take the picture of this old ruin. It has been featured in many commercials including a Qantas commercial that was shot a number of years ago.

In this blog, I am going to show two series of pictures. Both are of the same theme of the old ruin. One was shot over 6 hours before the grass turned green and the other one in winter where the grass has turned green ,  over 5 hours as a result of winter.

The series where the grass is not green was shot at the beginning on winter before the heavy rain came and the grass had not turned. This was shot this year in 2017 and normally this old ruin would have a crop in it. This year is the year for the land to be rested.

I have shot this old ruin consistently over 30 years and I could do a book just on the moods of this old ruin. So why have I shot it for such a long time? Well hopefully when you see the images, that will answer that question. maybe later I will do a blog on this old place showing it spanning over 30 years.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I have written other blogs about patience and photography is just that. Patience is one of the key elements in photography. Many of the images that you see that inspire you, just don’t present it self to you. Many are a result of time and patience. Sounds simple doesnt it? How many people could actually sit for 6 hours and observing the clouds, the changing light and the moving shadows.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This next series of pictures as just that. Changing skies, shifting shadows and the ever presence of light that reflects all sorts of moods.

These pictures that are featured here are not featured in the order that they were taken, but were all taken on the same day.

Often I get asked, ” aren’t you sick of going to the same subject all the time. The short answer is no. Why is that? It’s because it is all about the skies  and light for me. They are never static and with those two elements always shifting and moving there is a wealth of photographic opportunities that are presented to you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Is one picture better than the other? No. The movement of skies, light will always give you a different mood and it is really up to you which changing mood really does move you the most.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Light is the key essence in all photography. It doesn’t matter if it is landscape photography through to shooting models and everything else in between, it’s all about the light and nothing but the light. When you understand the power of the light, you’ll see why going back to an area all the time will always give you new and exciting results.

When we look at a subject, we should really view it in the way that highlghts the light on the given subject .Sounds simple right? I see many pictures taken when the image has the potential of being an outstanding image but where the image has fallen down, is that the light is all wrong. All the photographer had to do was move a little this way or that or come back at another time during the day. Light makes or breaks the picture.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Be bold and don’t be worried about going back to an area many times over. Explore and allow your eyes to see past the obvious and allow them to discover the light and all that the light has to offer. In my opinion you can never go back too often to one place as one day you will be rewarded with stunning light and it will teach you how the right light can bless you beyond what you thought possible. 🙂

Pete Dobré

Author Pete Dobré

Pete's photography is self taught. As a young child photography was an interest. His passion for the varying landscapes of Oz comes from frequent visits as a youngster, to his Gandparent's sheep farm in Barmera, a small country town in South Australia. Pete Dobré is a Freelance Photographer who blazes the trail for 6 months each year, capturing awe-inspiring images. Pete's work expresses his creative flair, emotions and love for the natural scapes of Australia. He remembers the hot day when he was 8, leaving town for the farm. His parents had an old car. Within about 2 kilometres of reaching the farm gate, they were bogged on a small red sand dune. The flies were buzzing continuously and the heat was beating down. Sticks, leaves and branches were wedged under the back tyres, to get the car moving. His mum was in a panic but Pete thought that it was exciting. From that moment he knew that he loved being out in creation, with the sense of adventure in the wild. This is where Pete's passion began. Photography for Pete is an expressive means for visual communication. He says, 'There is never a boring moment in my work. There is always something to photograph and I love being creative. The only limit to creativity is a lack of creativity.' Pete's aim as a photographer is to present images that provoke and stimulate the mind, to capture God's awesome creation and to share this with others. If Pete can do a little justice to God's creativity, then he is quietly satisfied. As a photographer Pete's inspiration and passion for his work comes from knowing God who created everything in the beginning. Knowing God, the Creator gives more substance and meaning to what he captures on film. Pete sees his role as freezing a moment in time and history which will never be repeated exactly the same again. The light, clouds and seasons will always be different. Pete's love for natural conditions at different times of the day, displaying varying moods and cloud formations makes his work very special and eye catching.

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